Virginia State Bar

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Conference of Local Bar Associations

A Conference of the Virginia State Bar.

Conference News and Information

March 12, 2008

Conference of Local Bar Associations Moves to New VSB Web Site Conference Template

The Conference of Local Bar Associations Web site has moved to the Virginia State Bar's new conference template for the Web site. Features include a more flexible and searchable content management system and navigation similar to the rest of the Virginia State Bar's site. The Web site migration is one of several updates that the conference is receiving. The conference will be receiving design updates for all its facets and a new electronic newsletter, all intended to help the CLBA members stay connected and informed. Stay tuned for more CLBA features in the coming month, and check back regularly for the latest in CLBA information.

The Conference of Local Bar Associations: Get connected.

 

 

July 7, 2008

Voluntary Bar Associations Win VSB Awards

07/07/08


Local and specialty bar associations across Virginia have been recognized by the Virginia State Bar’s Conference of Local Bar Associations for programs that serve the bench, the bar, and the people of Virginia. The recipients and programs are:

Awards of Merit (for excellence):

Fredericksburg Area Bar Association — Reviving Law Day, which returned to the association’s past practice of observing Law Day by providing speakers at area high schools. Topics were “Choose Law” and “So You’re 18,” using resources provided by the Virginia State Bar.

Local Government Attorneys’ Association — Local Government Attorneys’ Guide to Pro Bono Publico Service, a reference manual to promote pro bono work. The guide was produced and distributed by members of the association with a grant from the Virginia Law Foundation.

Prince William County Bar Association — Middle School Court Tours, which organized trips to the Prince William County Judicial Center and Adult Detention Center. The students visited while court was in session. They ended their tour by participating in a mock trial of a hypothetical case involving underage drinking at an unsupervised party. Judges, attorneys, and law enforcement personnel served as guides.

Virginia Beach Bar Association — Law Day Gala, an observance of the fiftieth anniversary of Law Day. The association’s Virginia Beach Bar Foundation sponsored a performance by Clay Jenkinson, a humanities scholar, in the persona of Thomas Jefferson talking about the importance of the rule of law. The program raised funds for the foundation, which works to meet legal needs of the poor, educate about law, and support the efficiency and integrity of the judicial process and administration of justice.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Loudoun County Chapter — Adoption Day Ceremony and Fair, held November 17, 2007, at the courthouse in Leesburg. The event included an invitation-only ceremony to honor seven families who had adopted or finalized adoptions in the past year. Following the ceremony, an Adoption Day Fair took place in the courthouse library. There, the association distributed materials and dispelled misconceptions about the difficulty of adoption. Judges, the Loudoun Department of Family Services, and local businesses participated in the event.

Certificates of Achievement (for high achievement):

Arlington County Bar Association (two programs) — A Green Initiative to reduce the paper documents generated by its office. Archival information has been scanned into electronic form and the original papers recycled. The bar adopted an electronic system for incoming faxes. It now e-mails invoices where possible and purchases paper with a high recycled content. Also, a New Membership System that consolidates billing, communication, and information-gathering needs.

Lynchburg Bar Association — Wills for Heroes, which provided wills, powers of attorney, and medical directives for first responders from the Lynchburg police, sheriff’s, fire, and emergency medical services departments. The program provided documents to 178 individuals, and educated more than 250 first responders about estate planning issues. The services were provided by attorneys from the bar and a law professor and students from Liberty University School of Law.

Metro Richmond Women’s Bar Association — Online Membership Registration and Directory, which provides more efficient management of the members’ registration, payment, and contact data.

Norfolk & Portsmouth Bar Association — Middle School Mock Trial Project, a ten-week course on elements of a criminal trial. Students from four schools attended lectures on opening statement, direct and cross examination, and closing arguments. They then conduct a trial before two judges and juries of their middle school peers.

Roanoke Bar Association — Trial Advocacy Program, designed at the request of a federal magistrate judge to be a seminar for inexperienced lawyers. The seminar also included a component for seasoned attorneys and a mock trial. In addition to providing continuing legal education, the program raised money for the Roanoke Bar Association Foundation.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association — A conference, “Votes for Women: Perspectives on Participation in Politics,” which drew on the association’s twenty-fifth anniversary celebration to focus on ways in which women attorneys can enter the political arena or support women candidates for political office.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Northern Virginia Chapter — Legislative Reception Program, which focused on mental health legal issues before the 2008 General Assembly. Panelists included participants in the Chief Justice’s Commission on Mental Health Law Reform and the Governor’s Independent Virginia Tech Review Panel and others who work with persons with mental illness.
July 7, 2008

Former Virginia State Bar President Is Local Bar Leader of the Year


7/7/08

Jeannie P. Dahnk, a Fredericksburg lawyer, has been named 2008 Local Bar Leader of the Year by the Virginia State Bar Conference of Local Bar Associations.

Dahnk was president of the VSB for the 2003–04 fiscal year and has served it in many ways since. But it was also her participation in the Fredericksburg Area Bar Association that led the association to nominate her for the Local Bar Leader Award, which recognizes dedication of bar leaders and close cooperation with the VSB. The award was presented June 20 during the VSB Annual Meeting in Virginia Beach.

In its nomination letter, the association credited Dahnk for establishing an executive director position to promote the association’s community involvement, enhance membership, and reunite bar members. While Dahnk was president of the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit Bar Association, she and her husband and law partner, William E. Glover, taught an ethics seminar as part of an overnight social gathering at the Tides Inn in Irvington.

She has arranged for guest speakers from around the state to address luncheon meetings of the Fredericksburg Area Bar. She has spoken at local schools for Law Day programs and participated in mock trials. And she mentors lawyers. “She is always available to a lawyer who is anxious about an ethical issue or a practice problem. Her counsel is often sought by candidates for judicial appointments,” the bar association letter states.

Dahnk currently travels the state to present “The Devil Wore Green,” a seminar about lawyer trust accounting. Dahnk developed the seminar with the ethics staff of the VSB. Recently, Dahnk also has been writing and speaking to groups about her opposition to mandatory legal malpractice insurance — a proposal under consideration by the VSB.

She practices insurance defense with Glover & Dahnk . She and Glover have two sons.

“Jeannie Dahnk strives for professionalism and is a motivating influence to those around her,” the bar wrote. “[H]er charisma and charm make her one of many strong, powerful, influential women that others admire and respect.”
August 29, 2008

Public Service is Theme of Baliles’s Speech

Former Gov. Gerald L. Baliles delivered the following remarks on the citizen lawyer at the July 21, 2008, Solo & Small-Firm Practitioner Forum in Virginia Beach, Virginia.


The Remarks of The Honorable Gerald L. Baliles
Former Governor of Virginia
Director of the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia
Delivered at the Virginia State Bar Solo and Small-Firm Practitioner Forum
Regent University School of Law
Virginia Beach, Virginia July 21, 2008

Distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen.

It’s a pleasure to be a part of your forum for solo and small-firm practitioners.

I grew up in a small town in a rural area along Southern Virginia’s Blue Ridge Parkway. I knew as a child, observed as a teenager, and worked with as an adult, many wonderful lawyers – in small towns and large ones – who were solo or small-firm attorneys. They have always impressed me with their dedication to the law, their representation of their clients and their leadership roles in their communities.

That’s what I want to talk about today – the decline of the citizen lawyer and necessary revival.

Bill Wilson, your program chair and a good friend of mine, is a good example of that citizen lawyer tradition that I want to talk about – a good lawyer who has found the time to serve in the Virginia General Assembly, on the board of Virginia Intermont College, chair of the Virginia State Bar’s Senior Law Section, a leader in his church and civic organizations.

When one thinks about it, Virginia has an unrivaled tradition of citizen lawyers – lawyers of honed ability and integrity who take positions of civic and political leadership, and apply their skills for the broad public good. Many of our schoolbook heroes from Virginia history (four hundred years of it now) are lawyers: Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, John Marshall, Lewis Powell, Oliver W. Hill Sr. and Leroy R. Hassell Sr. – to name only several.

And this assembled gathering today – without flattery – brings together true citizen lawyers, of the first order, from across the commonwealth.

The profession is strong in Virginia, its seedbed, and is doing good work, all the political chatter and criticism notwithstanding.

A colleague and I were remarking the other day that the future of the profession is promising, too – the commonwealth today has a more glittering array of law schools, I think, than perhaps any other state.

But something hard to put a finger on, something hard to name exactly, increasingly feels awry with the profession, with OUR profession. I suspect you’ve had occasional senses of it, too.

According to an old Roman saying, an illness, that is at first hard to diagnose, but easy to treat, later becomes increasingly easy to diagnose but impossible to treat.

It’s hard to put a finger on it, this sense of something amiss, but I have it.

Sometimes the sense washes across me when I’m reading Virginia Lawyer’s Weekly and I see an article about this or that company “automating” some of its legal needs – having a software program fill out patent applications or employment contracts. Not too many years ago a bill was introduced in the General Assembly to allow automated legal kiosks that would dump out legal formula wills and divorce papers. And today, I’m sure you must have seen the advertisements by a recognizable name in the legal profession, about the convenience of visiting a website to find the forms to assist one with setting up wills, opening businesses, and a variety of related legal services anywhere in the country.

Sometimes it washes over me when I’m at a bar meeting and I talk to law students who express a deep concern that actually practicing law will be intolerable, and they lament heading down the track to becoming a lawyer. Or it rushes over me when I talk to lawyers in practice who are burned out and desperate to change careers.

I am not humorless, but it hits me when I hear the ubiquitous lawyer jokes, and I laugh at most of them.

It hit me recently when I realized how few lawyers there are now in the General Assembly – maybe two dozen. When I was first elected to the House some thirty years ago, almost three quarters of the member of the General Assembly were lawyers. The best, most substantive debates came up on the floor when a lawyer would ask a penetrating question that hadn’t been considered in committee. Citizen lawyers have been at the heart of the work of the General Assembly.

When I look at civic organizations today in Virginia, I likewise also often find myself wondering, where are the citizen lawyers? Automated contracts, lawyer jokes, nervous law students and burned-out lawyers point to a real unease with, and in, the profession. Our thinning ranks in the General Assembly and civic organizations, even bar activities, point to diminished leadership by citizen lawyers.

I think the unease and our diminished leadership are related.

Let me explain.

Over the past generation, to be sure, the billable hour, especially in the larger firms, has come to lord it over us like never before. The dizzying array of statues and regulations has only grown, demanding more and more time of us to keep pace, and fostering more and more tight specialization. In many regards wisely, we’ve become very conscious of conflicts of interest, and often preclude ourselves, and our law partners, from sitting on boards – public or private – with which we may do business in our practice.

The past few decades have brought us an increasing number of excuses for avoiding summons to leadership as a profession.

You’ve heard theses response, I’m sure: “I’m too busy” – “It’s outside what I do” –“I can’t, because I have a potential conflict.” Any of these, in any given circumstance, may be utterly appropriate for any one of us, individually, to say.

We may, though, have begun to say them collectively as a profession.

When we don’t rise to service, and our profession fails to deeply encourage it, it’s not entirely surprising that law students become nervous and lawyers become burned out – because I believe lawyers choose the profession and go into practice in order to contribute to the public good. Lawyers are practical, but lawyers also – especially the best – have a twinge of idealism, a yearning to do good, to act as citizen lawyers, in the long tradition.

Much of the dissatisfaction in the profession, I think, stems from frustration in not engaging in earnest in that tradition so proudly established in the commonwealth many generations ago.

In my judgment, we would very much help ourselves by a new devotion, as a profession, to leading as citizen lawyers. We would help our image and understanding with the public as well. But, most importantly, we would also further contribute to the public good, in vital ways, which others – non-lawyers – simply cannot accomplish with the same honed ability. Shaped by practice, lawyers have skills which are sorely missed when absent in public affairs.

Maybe we don’t enunciate these skills often enough.

Consider them with me quickly. On reflection I think it’s clear what is missing when we don’t offer them to the public good.

These “lawyers skills” fall into three basic categories – to my way of thinking. Put very simply, lawyers are good at connecting the dots; we’re good with language, and we’ve typically got a good “people sense.”

Let’s look briefly at each of these.

? Good at Connecting the Dots.
Lawyers by profession assess risk all the time. All the time we’re thinking “how does this affect that?” We do this in almost everything we do – cases, contracts, transactions, advising. Having to assess risk all the time leads to very logical thinking. Lawyers have a practiced ability to see all the way through things and separate the wheat from the chaff.

This logical thinking, risk assessing, leads also to a honed sense for trends, especially with the government, which is, really a machine made up of law. Sensing trends – connecting the dots – is very important. Again and again throughout our history in Virginia and America, lawyers have stood to protect freedoms: Jefferson for religion, Lincoln against slavery, Thurgood Marshall for civil rights.

Lawyers have always known that the old saying from Shakespeare – “First thing we do, let’s kill all the lawyers” – is not a reproach but a compliment. Lawyers are especially entrusted to be guardians – whom tyrannizing and demagogic forces (at loose today, just as in history) would just as soon not have around.

? Good with Language.
Lawyers, because we tend to write every day, tend to write well and precisely. And also, since by profession we’re required to speak frequently, we tend to speak well. Also importantly, with their practiced precision with language, lawyers tend to listen well too, and get to the heart of matters.

Language is crucial. The written word is what the public has to memorialize agreements and set policy and law. The spoken word is the means to explain and debate, so plainly vital to democracy.

? Good “People Sense.”
Lawyers, because of what we do – in our practice, our pro bono work, in our duties as citizen lawyers – deal substantively with lots and lots of people doing lots and lots of different types of things – things the details of which lawyers come to have a real sense of. Because lawyers know and deal with so many different people in such detailed ways, we tend to be good at directing traffic – at making connections: “Oh you need help with this – well, Jones might be good to talk to; you might also try Smith.”

Related to this: law is a profession that especially has in it a real diversity of people too, something I’m very proud of. Lawyers, maybe a little more than the average person, know people of all colors and all stripes – making them even better at making connections.

On the “people sense” front as well, because of all of the people lawyers deal with and all of the human drama we witness, lawyers often have a good, quick sense of what motivates people. In a given situation, we have a honed sense for “what’s really going on,” for what games (if any) are being played and who’s playing them. We also usefully, even in the thick of debate with people on any given matter, understand that the disagreement is not – or need not be – personal, not ad hominem.

So, we’re good at connecting the dots, good with language, and have a good “people sense” – which is another way of saying: we’re good at helping bring some order, some understandability to things that are unclear, things that are hazy – unclear trends, unclear language, unclear situations with people.

In a complex, fractious world (only becoming more and more so) lawyers are clarifiers and harmonizers – or can be, when we take it upon ourselves to get involved.

I think a lack of involvement, that has been increasing, is at the root of the unease in the profession, and at the root of the unease with the profession.

I think a lack of involvement is also a harm to the public.

The public good – government and civic life – fundamentally depends on citizen lawyers, present from the beginning of the American experiment in free society, and depends on citizen lawyers’ rare abilities – to clarify, to harmonize.

I’m preaching to the very faithful here, of course, my friends. You carry the tradition.

Indulge me here, to close with a few thoughts.

You are citizen lawyers. So, keep serving – and offer to lead the organizations you are a part of. Take on new ones.

Very candidly, whether Republican or Democrat, consider public office. If not you, then who?

Find a young lawyer of promise – or two – or three – and tell them with conviction that they are a part of the Virginia tradition, unbroken, of citizen lawyers, with duties to the Commonwealth and the public good.

We can help with the needed revival of the citizen lawyer, already alive among you here. The way I see things, anything awry can be set straight, and our profession, already storied, should ensure that storied days are still ahead. That’s the way our predecessors thought. That’s what they would want us to do – all across Virginia.

There’s one other thing they might want me to say: It’s time to wrap things up and say thanks very much.

So, many thanks for lunch and the invitation to be a part of your proceedings.

Besides, as that non-lawyer, Mark Twain, used to say: “Being talked to death is a terrible way to go.”

Thank you.

June 18, 2009

Staunton Lawyer Named Local Bar Leader of 2009

Rupen R. Shah, immedidate past president of the Augusta County Bar Association, has been named Local Bar Leader of the Year by the Virginia State Bar’s Conference of Local Bar Associations.

Shah, an assistant commonwealth’s attorney in Staunton, was nominated by another member of the Augusta bar in recognition of several projects he has overseen in that region.

The award recognizes dedication of bar leaders and close cooperation with the VSB. He will receive the award on June 19 during the Virginia State Bar’s annual meeting in Virginia Beach.

Shah led the establishment of the Valley Children’s Advocacy Center, a nonprofit agency that helps law enforcement and Child Protective Services workers interview abused and neglected children. The center’s goal is to reduce trauma and advance the child’s recovery.

He set up a committee that established a procedure for judicial nominations.

He represented the association at a Court Docket Improvement Seminar that led to elimination of all-day waits for juvenile court cases to be heard. He organized So You’re 18 programs for two thousand high school seniors in Staunton, Waynesboro, and Augusta County, to teach them the rights and responsibilities that come with adulthood.

Shah also arranged seminars to give lawyers in the rural Shenandoah Valley easier access to continuing legal education, including the courses required to qualify as court-appointed counsel to indigent clients.

A native of India, Shah has a law degree from Syracuse University.  

“In court, Mr. Shah is always prepared, professional, and insists on professionalism from others,” attorney Susan M. Johnson wrote in the nomination letter.

 

 

 

 

December 15, 2009

Voluntary Bar Associations Win VSB Awards

Local and specialty bar associations across Virginia have been recognized by the Virginia State Bar’s Conference of Local Bar Associations for programs that serve the bench, the bar, and the people of Virginia.  The recipients and programs are:

Awards of Merit (for excellence):

Fredericksburg Area Bar AssociationReviving Law Day, which returned to the association’s past practice of observing Law Day by providing speakers at area high schools. Topics were “Choose Law” and “So You’re 18,” using resources provided by the Virginia State Bar.

Local Government Attorneys’ AssociationLocal Government Attorneys’ Guide to Pro Bono Publico Service, a reference manual to promote pro bono work. The guide was produced and distributed by members of the association with a grant from the Virginia Law Foundation.

Prince William County Bar AssociationMiddle School Court Tours, which organized trips to the Prince William County Judicial Center and Adult Detention Center. The students visited while court was in session. They ended their tour by participating in a mock trial of a hypothetical case involving underage drinking at an unsupervised party. Judges, attorneys, and law enforcement personnel served as guides.  

Virginia Beach Bar AssociationLaw Day Gala, an observance of the fiftieth anniversary of Law Day. The association’s Virginia Beach Bar Foundation sponsored a performance by Clay Jenkinson, a humanities scholar, in the persona of Thomas Jefferson talking about the importance of the rule of law. The program raised funds for the foundation, which works to meet legal needs of the poor, educate about law, and support the efficiency and integrity of the judicial process and administration of justice.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Loudoun County ChapterAdoption Day Ceremony and Fair, held November 17, 2007, at the courthouse in Leesburg. The event included an invitation-only ceremony to honor seven families who had adopted or finalized adoptions in the past year. Following the ceremony, an Adoption Day Fair took place in the courthouse library.  There, the association distributed materials and dispelled misconceptions about the difficulty of adoption. Judges, the Loudoun Department of Family Services, and local businesses participated in the event.

Certificates of Achievement (for high achievement):

Arlington County Bar Association (two programs) – A Green Initiative to reduce the paper documents generated by its office. Archival information has been scanned into electronic form and the original papers recycled. The bar adopted an electronic system for incoming faxes. It now e-mails invoices where possible and purchases paper with a high recycled content. Also, a New Membership System that consolidates billing, communication, and information-gathering needs.

Lynchburg Bar AssociationWills for Heroes, which provided wills, powers of attorney, and medical directives for first responders from the Lynchburg police, sheriff’s, fire, and emergency medical services departments.  The program provided documents to 178 individuals, and educated more than 250 first responders about estate planning issues. The services were provided by attorneys from the bar and a law professor and students from Liberty University School of Law.

Metro Richmond Women’s Bar AssociationOnline Membership Registration and Directory, which provides more efficient management of the members’ registration, payment, and contact data.  

Norfolk & Portsmouth Bar AssociationMiddle School Mock Trial Project, a ten-week course on elements of a criminal trial.  Students from four schools attended lectures on opening statement, direct and cross examination, and closing arguments. They then conduct a trial before two judges and juries of their middle school peers.

Roanoke Bar AssociationTrial Advocacy Program, designed at the request of a federal magistrate judge to be a seminar for inexperienced lawyers.  The seminar also included a component for seasoned attorneys and a mock trial. In addition to providing continuing legal education, the program raised money for the Roanoke Bar Association Foundation.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association – A conference, “Votes for Women: Perspectives on Participation in Politics,” which drew on the association’s twenty-fifth anniversary celebration to focus on ways in which women attorneys can enter the political arena or support women candidates for political office.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Northern Virginia ChapterLegislative Reception Program, which focused on mental health legal issues before the 2008 General Assembly. Panelists included participants in the Chief Justice’s Commission on Mental Health Law Reform and the Governor’s Independent Virginia Tech Review Panel and others who work with persons with mental illness.

 

January 14, 2010

Message from the CLBA Chair


Gifford Ray Hampshire's December 2009 Virginia Lawyer column

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January 14, 2010

Call for Nominations: Awards of Merit


The twenty-fifth annual Awards of Merit will be presented at the VSB Annual Meeting in June 2010. Past projects that received Awards of Merit have included volunteering at local shelters, participation in “no bills” nights, various CLE programs, mentoring programs, law camps, essay contests, blood and food drives, and many others. Deadline for entry is April 30, 2010.

more information 

February 22, 2010

Message from the CLBA Chair


Gifford Ray Hampshire's February 2010 Virginia Lawyer column

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April 14, 2010

Message from the CLBA Chair


Gifford Ray Hampshire's April 2010 Virginia Lawyer column

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July 16, 2010

Message from the CLBA Chair


Gifford Ray Hampshire's June/July 2010 Virginia Lawyer column

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October 19, 2010

Message from the CLBA Chair


Nancy M. Reed's October 2010 Virginia Lawyer column

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December 14, 2010

Message from the CLBA Chair

Nancy M. Reed's December 2010 Virginia Lawyer column

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February 21, 2011

Message from the CLBA Chair

Nancy M. Reed's February 2011 Virginia Lawyer column

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April 13, 2011

Message from the CLBA Chair

Nancy M. Reed's April 2011 Virginia Lawyer column

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June 1, 2011

2011 Awards of Merit

The following bar associations received awards from the Conference of Local Bar Associations during the Virginia State Bar Annual Meeting. The awards recognize projects that serve the bench, the bar, and the people of Virginia.

This year for the first time, the CLBA recognized projects sustained by bars for several years, as well as new projects. The CLBA makes information on winning projects available to other groups that want to consider similar programs. For information, contact Paulette J. Davidson at Davidson@vsb.org or (804) 775-0521.

 

Awards of Merit

For excellence in bar projects

 

First-time awardees:

 

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Loudoun Chapter
Senior Symposium: An educational program for seniors, their families, and concerned citizens

 

Loudoun County Bar Association
Operation Turkey Dinner, to provide Thanksgiving meals to families of schoolchildren who qualify for the Free/Reduced Lunch Program

 

The Prince William County Bar Association Inc.
Introduction to Practicing Law in the Prince William County Courthouse, for newly licensed attorneys

 

Norfolk & Portsmouth Bar Association
Legal Legacy Tree Grove, planted in Lafayette Park as part of Norfolk’s Celebrate Trees! Initiative

 

Washington Metropolitan Area Corporate Counsel Association
Corporate Counsel Scholars Program, to create a diversity pipeline between law schools and in-house counsel jobs

 

Roanoke Bar Association and Salem/Roanoke County Bar Association
Rule of Law Project, established by the Virginia Bar Association to bring citizen lawyers into middle schools

 

Sustained Projects:

 

The Alexandria Bar Association
Beat the Odds Scholarship Program for students aged 13 to 21 — started in 2004

 

Loudoun County Bar Association and Fauquier County Bar Association
Leadership in the Law Summer Camps, to teach high school students about the justice system and encourage them to consider a legal career — started in 1999

 

Roanoke Bar Association
Barrister Book Buddies, to help children in Roanoke City Public Schools learn to read — started in 1999

 

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Loudoun Chapter
Adoption Day Programs, to celebrate and encourage adoptions — started in 2006

 

Certificates of Achievement
For high achievement in bar projects

 

Fredericksburg Area Bar Association
Law Day project to present programs on legal topics in public schools

 

Metropolitan Richmond Women’s Bar Association
“Understanding Your Domestic Relations Rights in Virginia” pamphlet translated into Spanish

 

The Alexandria Bar Association
Gridiron Musical Show & Dinner, featuring entertainment that satirizes current events and courthouse personalities

 

Norfolk & Portsmouth Bar Association
Breakfasts with the Bench to promote bench-bar relations

 

June 1, 2011

Fredericksburg Attorney Named Local Bar Leader of 2011

Tracy Ann Houck, a lifelong Fredericksburg resident who reenergized the Fredericksburg Bar Association for the benefit of local attorneys and the community, has been named a Local Bar Leader of the Year by the Virginia State Bar’s Conference of Local Bar Associations.

The award recognizes continued dedication of bar leaders and close cooperation with the VSB. Houck’s recognition is one of two bestowed by the conference in 2011.

Houck has a civil litigation practice with Parrish, Houck & Snead PLC in Fredericksburg. “In 2006, while President of the Fredericksburg Area Bar Association, she was the instrumental force in regaining the vitality, interest and membership of the Bar Association, and continues to be actively involved,” according to her nomination from the association.

Houck also is involved with the legal community statewide, through many groups. She cochairs the annual Solo and Small Firm Conference for the Virginia Trial Lawyers Association and served a three-year term on the faculty of the Virginia State Bar’s Mandatory Professionalism Course. She is a member of the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit Bar Association (for which she was president in 2000), the Virginia Association of Defense Attorneys, the Virginia Joint Alternative Dispute Resolution Committee, and Phi Delta Phi, a fraternity that promotes a high standard of legal ethics.

She also is on the executive committee of Friends of the Rappahannock, which maintains and preserves the Rappahannock River and its tributaries.

Houck holds a bachelor’s degree from the College of William and Mary, a Publishing Institute degree from the University of Denver, and a law degree from the University of Richmond. She taught English in Tokyo for two years, and was a copy editor, editor, and technical writer in New York for several years. After law school, she worked as a law editor for the Michie Company in Charlottesville.

“Throughout Tracy’s career, she has promoted the legal profession with total dedication, full commitment, integrity, and complete devotion. She continues to be a role model for women attorneys,” according to the nomination letter. “Tracy strives for professionalism and is a motivating influence to those around her.”

The Local Bar Leader of the Year Awards will be presented on June 17 during the VSB’s annual meeting in Virginia Beach.

June 1, 2011

Freddie Mac Attorney Named Local Bar Leader of 2011

Andrea L. Bridgeman, a corporate lawyer whose active pro bono service has included opening opportunities for other corporate counsel to represent low-income clients in Virginia without charge, has been named a Local Bar Leader of the Year by the Virginia State Bar?s Conference of Local Bar Associations.

The award recognizes continued dedication of bar leaders and close cooperation with the VSB. Bridgeman?s recognition is one of two bestowed by the conference in 2011.

Bridgeman is associate general counsel at Freddie Mac in McLean. She has worked within her company, with the Fairfax Bar Association and other local bars and legal aid societies, in continuing legal education classes, and through the Virginia State Bar to provide direct legal assistance to low-income clients and to make it possible for other corporate counsel to provide limited pro bono representations. She has served on the VSB?s Committee on Access to Legal Services since 2006 and is currently its chair.

In nominating her for the award, the Washington Metropolitan Area Corporate Counsel Association wrote, “Andrea has been involved in local bars at all levels, making sure that corporate counsel have a voice before these groups and play a visible role in bar activities.”

In Virginia, lawyers who hold bar-issued certificates as corporate counsel normally can represent only one client — the companies for whom they work. Bridgeman helped the Virginia State Bar and Supreme Court of Virginia develop rule changes that now allow these corporate counsel to provide uncompensated pro bono legal representations of other clients. Her work helped lift restrictions for supervision so that corporate counsel can have more flexibility in their pro bono service.
Her efforts opened the possibility that the 882 corporate counsel certificate holders in Virginia can join the ranks of lawyers who provide legal services to persons who do not have the means to pay legal fees.

In endorsing Bridgeman?s nomination, James A. Ferguson, executive director of Legal Services of Northern Virginia, wrote, “Despite holding a prominent position in the legal department of a busy company, she has devoted an amazing amount of volunteer time to legal aid and pro bono work. … I believe that a real leader is somebody who “walks the walk” — somebody who, rather than just paying lip service to the importance of concepts like access to justice, devotes their time and talents to making sure that our low-income neighbors have meaningful access to high-quality legal assistance. Andrea Bridgeman has done just that.”

Bridgeman holds an undergraduate degree from Bryn Mawr College and a law degree from the University of Virginia.

The Local Bar Leader of the Year Award will be presented on June 17 during the VSB?s annual meeting in Virginia Beach.

July 18, 2011

Message from the CLBA Chair

Nancy M. Reed's June/July 2011 Virginia Lawyer column

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July 25, 2011

CLBA Annual Report 2010-11

To review the CLBA Annual Report for 2010-11, please click here.
October 14, 2011

Message from the CLBA Chair

Edward L. Weiner's October 2011 Virginia Lawyer column

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December 19, 2011

Message from the CLBA Chair

Edward L. Weiner's December 2011 Virginia Lawyer column

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February 21, 2012

Message from the CLBA Chair

Edward L. Weiner's February 2012 Virginia Lawyer column

download PDF file

 

April 17, 2012

Message from the CLBA Chair

Edward L. Weiner's April 2012 Virginia Lawyer column

download PDF file

 

June 1, 2012

2012 Awards of Merit

The following bar associations received awards from the Conference of Local Bar Associations during the Virginia State Bar Annual Meeting. The awards recognize projects that serve the bench, the bar, and the people of Virginia.

The CLBA makes information on winning projects available to other groups that want to consider similar programs. For information, contact Paulette J. Davidson at Davidson@vsb.org or (804) 775-0521.

AWARDS OF MERIT

For excellence in bar projects

First-time Awardees:

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Loudoun Chapter
Empty Bowls, an international effort to fight hunger, benefitting the local food pantry for Loudoun County.

Metropolitan Richmond Women’s Bar Association
CARITAS Partnership, providing pro bono legal services, donations of furniture and home goods, and volunteer labor.

The Prince William County Bar Association Inc.
Holly Acres Pro Bono Project, providing free legal services to residents of the Holly Acres Mobile Home Park who were displaced by flooding from tropical storm Lee.
 

Sustained Projects:

Local Government Attorneys Association of Virginia
The Handbook of Virginia Local Government Law, first published in 1982.

The Prince William County Bar Association Inc.
So You’re 18 presentations in schools, started in 1999.

Roanoke Bar Association
Santa in the Square holiday party for children and their families living in area shelters, started in 2006.
 

CERTIFICATES OF ACHIEVEMENT

For high achievement in bar projects

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Prince William Chapter
Holiday Party and Gift Drive, providing gifts to more than twenty needy children in the area.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Prince William Chapter
Annual Circuit Court Judicial Law Clerks’ Reception, fostering acquaintances among local practicing lawyers and new law clerks.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association, Hampton Roads Chapter
Norfolk Social Services Holiday Foster Care Project, providing gifts to needy foster children.

Fredericksburg Area Bar Association
Law Day, educating as many students as possible in elementary, middle and high schools about the law.

Loudoun County Bar Association
Back to School with the Loudoun Bar, distributing more than 300 backpacks containing school supplies to needy children in the county.

The Prince William County Bar Association Inc.
Books for Troubled Teens, providing books about positive role models to teens in the county juvenile detention center and the juvenile shelter.

The Prince William County Bar Association Inc.
Historic Preservation Project, celebrating the 70th anniversary of the association.

Virginia Women Attorneys Association
Beyond Networking: Defining Yourself in Today’s Market, helping women attorneys define themselves by learning the latest trends in today’s market in order to advance their careers.

Roanoke Bar Association
Mentor Match Program, providing new lawyers with the tools to enable them to attain professional excellence.

 

July 16, 2013

The CLBA portion of the VSB 75th annual report is now available

The 75th Annual Report of the VSB details the activities of the CLBA during the 2012-13 bar year, written by then-CLBA chair P. George Eliades II.